Controlling Nearsightedness for Children Who Don’t Want Contact Lenses.

A very diluted concentration of Atropine in 0.01% can be safely and effectively used to slow down the worsening of myopia (link back to Slowing Childhood Nearsightedness page).

There are well controlled clinical studies, with the longest study period being 5 years, showing that Atropine 0.01% used once nightly can slow nearsightedness by about 50% 1-7.

The eye drop is simply used at night, and your child can wear their up-to-date eyeglasses during the day. As a parent, you may worry about the possible side effects of this eye drop. Rest assured, the occurrence of side effects – including blurred near vision and light sensitivity – is low and manageable because a very diluted concentration of Atropine is used.

In many parts of Asia and in Australia, children are already benefiting from Atropine Eye Drop Therapy.

If your child is aged 6 to 12 and experiencing a worsening of nearsightedness of more than 0.50D per year, Atropine 0.01% can be a safe, simple, and effective treatment.  Again, the standard of care at Dr. Allyson Tang’s Optometry Clinic is to first decide whether your child is a candidate for Atropine Eye Drop Therapy.  Results may vary for each individual and careful assessment with proper follow-ups are a must.

Discuss with your eye doctor whether Atropine is a good option for your child.

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  2. Duncan G, Collison DJ. Role of the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the eye: a review. Life Sci 2003;72:2013-2019.
  3. Chua WH, Balakrishnan V, Chan YH, et al. Atropine for the treatment of childhood myopia. Ophthalmology 2006;113:2285-2291.
  4. Tong L, Huang XL, Koh AL, et al. Atropine for the treatment of childhood myopia: effect on myopia progression after cessation of atropine. Ophthalmology 2009;116:572-579.
  5. Chia A, Chua WH, Cheung YB, et al. Atropine for the treatment of childhood Myopia: Safety and efficacy of 0.5%, 0.1%, and 0.01% doses (Atropine for the Treatment of Myopia 2). Ophthalmology 2012;119:347-354.
  6. Chia A, Chua WH, Wen L, et al. Atropine for the treatment of childhood myopia: changes after stopping atropine 0.01%, 0.1% and 0.5%. Am J Ophthalmol 2014;157:451-457 e451.
  7.  Chia, Audrey et al. Five-Year Clinical Trial on Atropine for the Treatment of Myopia 2. Ophthalmology , Volume 123 , Issue 2 , 391 – 399.